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One of the episodes was based on the absurd idea that the metre track was actually quite a bit less than metres long.

In the end there are only our idealisations, the terrorist is a freedom fighter and a cynic and a madman and a confused victim of circumstance.

Each reading is available, each reading is as real as the others. Once you hear about this idea of the simulacrum it is really hard to not see it everywhere.

We live in a world of mirrors — each reflecting back at us distorted images, and desire is the force that manipulates what we are so that we confuse what we want to become with what we already are in our essential selves.

There is only these desires and these twisted representations. The idea that people inject botulism, a toxin that can and does kill, into their faces to make themselves look young strikes me as being essential to understanding this idea.

We are prepared to risk death so as to look young. View all 36 comments. Jun 25, Toby rated it it was ok. Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

Baudrillard, on the other hand, seems to have the complete opposite - explaining essentially simple although nontheless interesting concepts in overly complex terms.

While the core message of his essays is thought provoking and engaging, the text itself is so full of jargon, unnecessarily convoluted language, and a fair amount of repetition.

If you are anything like myself you will spend an hour reading, rereadi Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

If you are anything like myself you will spend an hour reading, rereading, and digesting a couple of pages before reaching a point where you can explain what Baudrillard was essentially saying in a few simple sentences.

Baudrillard also has a habit of making quite extravagant claims or suggestions with no proof, or even justification or much in the way of reasoning.

All in all a difficult and unrewarding read, I feel that I would have been better off reading something written by someone else about Baudrillard's ideas.

View all 18 comments. Jan 20, Adam rated it really liked it. Basically the idea is just that people increasingly base their lives around collective ideas of things -- and those ideas can readily shift around and become something detached from reality -- rather than the things themselves.

And that creates a free floating idea of society and the universe that supercedes concrete reality in its consequences. View all 3 comments.

Dec 21, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: shelf , mindfuq , metaphysics , psychology , science , non-fiction.

I admit I read this primarily because I learned that the whole cast of The Matrix was forced to read it to get them all primed and pumped for the deeper meaning of the film.

Welcome to the Desert of the Real. In fact, most of the most salient points of this classic work of philosophy ARE delineated in the movie!

One of the most telling points was when a certain piece of steak was getting cut and he was cutting a deal with the policemen of the Matrix, talking about how much BETTER the I admit I read this primarily because I learned that the whole cast of The Matrix was forced to read it to get them all primed and pumped for the deeper meaning of the film.

One of the most telling points was when a certain piece of steak was getting cut and he was cutting a deal with the policemen of the Matrix, talking about how much BETTER the steak is.

This book is a regular nightmare to get through if you prefer all your words to get right down to the truth of the matter without being overblown with jargon that could have been better spent elsewhere, but the IDEAS within it are pretty awesome.

And often ferociously antithetical to anything I believe. And yet, he's right on so many aspects and I want to fist-bump the air all the time while also, in an aside, wanting to revile him for being the worst kind of monster.

In other words, it's an awesome, divisive read. There's a lot of great reviews out her on this book, but let me sum up the most salient points: Maybe you've heard the saying that the map is not the terrain.

That the conceptualization, the ideal of a subject or a real-world representation is NOT the thing, itself. But what happens when all of reality IS just our conceptualizations of it?

Don't laugh. Our brains do not have a direct line to the world. We process it all through our perceptions and we are always getting that wrong.

So, the more we continue to map out the world, the bigger the map, the more likely we start losing the certainty that we're dealing with the map OR reality.

Pretty soon, and I mean this is true for every single one of us, we cannot tell the difference. This is an idea that has made it almost everywhere since , and I think we can thank Baudrillard for making it popular in academia.

He, himself, gives thanks to Philip K. Dick and Jorge Louis Borges and J. Ballard for his ideas, among certain mathematicians, philosophers, and nihilists of every stripe.

He also gives us many great examples to support the context and the theme that pretty much made me nod and grin and want to curse him. Because in a lot of ways, he's entirely right.

The debate about Art and Life is an old one. Art imitates Life, but Life imitates Art, too. We see it everywhere, from advertising to the great movies of nostalgia for times that never were to practically every dream we subscribe to.

There is no substance to it. It is an artistic representation that we want to become, but when enough of us strive for it, we change reality to fit that mold in countless little or even big ways until Life, or Reality, has been changed.

It doesn't alter the fact that there is no substance. It just means that we're all living the simulacra. The simulation, the Art, is merely the first step, but Art always has its foundations in the simulacra, the Real.

When we can no longer figure out what is life and what is art, we have figured out that we are stuck in a recursive loop. Many modern non-fiction books spell out the idea much more clearly than Baudrillard did.

All our language is an example of this. So is our preoccupation with Myths. Let's not forget the very concept of money.

They're all fake, but they're used in order to make a map of the terrain. And let's not fool ourselves. Most of us believe in the infallibility of money.

Come on. Give me some. View 2 comments. May 03, Bradley rated it really liked it. Totally, completely rad. I can just see people smoking bongs not getting this completely, but postmodernism IS the dominant episteme in the West How cool to be born when such a rad thinker like Baudrillard was doing his best stuff!

Your influence has infected the unwashed masses even in a providential back water redneck area like rural Binghamton NY where this student made his abode Wish I could write a book that could change the world, or tap into the zeitgeist I observe, I accept, I assume the immense process of the destruction of appearances..

Jews think this far into postmodernism as well? Rad, its not just new, its olde tyme as well The simulacrum is never that which conceals the truth-it is the truth which conceals that there is none.

The simulacrum is true. The dung beetle has left its profession for some weed. Sammy sucked Martha to death as he merrily smoked a joint.

It is a hyperreal… It is no longer a question of imitation, nor duplication, nor even parody. Is it a simulated bulkiness or a generous contribution to penile literature?

Furthermore, Baudrillard claims that Watergate was not a scandal but a mere trap set by the CIA and other governmental authorities to catch the adversaries.

No matter how much fearless fun you might on those magical rides, at the end of it you have to pimp the goat for an ounce of weed. When the lines between the real and unreal blurs one enters the world of simulation.

And what would happen when the real is no longer stiff it used to be? Will nostalgia assume it flaccid meaning? For further literary probing :- 1.

The Ecstasy of Communication - Jean Baudrillard 2. Leash - Jane DeLynn View all 17 comments. Oct 08, Lit Bug rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , popular-culture , literary-theory , academic , owned , sociology , ph-d , western-philosophy , postmodern.

To dissimulate is to pretend not to have what one has. To simulate is to feign to have what one doesn't have. But it is more complicated than that because simulating is not pretending: "Whoever fakes an illness can simply stay in bed and make everyone believe he is ill.

Examining popular culture and its signs as taking over reality and replacing it, leaving only an unreliable r To dissimulate is to pretend not to have what one has.

Examining popular culture and its signs as taking over reality and replacing it, leaving only an unreliable reference to the original which no longer exists, this philosophical treatise looks into the postmodern condition that leaves the line between the real and the simulation blurred.

The simulacrum is never that which conceals the truth—it is the truth which conceals that there is none. What is lost in the work that is serially reproduced, is its aura, its singular quality of the here and now, its aesthetic form it had already lost its ritual form, in its aesthetic quality , and, according to Benjamin, it takes on, in its ineluctable destiny of reproduction, a political form.

What is lost is the original, which only a history itself nostalgic and retrospective can reconstitute as "authentic.

However, I do have a bit of issues with Baudrillard, both stylistically and in terms of content. I do not really agree with everything he says — his reactions to some phenomena seem just as essentialist as those he critiques.

Sometimes, he comes across as paranoid in his zeal to impress upon us how unreal the real world is — I agree with him on his ideas, but not to the extent he takes his ideas.

While he acknowledges in the very beginning that the line between the real and the simulated is no longer clear as before, and what is real and what is not is now nearly inseparable — things can be both, and simultaneously.

GR itself seems to be a wonderful example of this phenomena — it is a real world, for many of us. Impossible to think of a life without it.

But then, do we really know anyone behind those avatars, photos and reviews? I bet some of us would not even have looked eye to eye in real life, no matter how wonderful reviews we wrote.

And yet, it is all real and simulated at the same time. But Baudrillard, in the latter part of the essay seems to insinuate more and more that nothing we see is real, everything about our life is simulated, especially communication on virtual platforms.

I think it is real and simulated, all at the same time. Another issue I have with him are on his ideas of Fascism; Fascism can already be interpreted as the "irrational" excess of mythic and political referentials, the mad intensification of collective value blood, race, people, etc.

Yet again, everything seems to escape this catastrophe of value, this neutralization and pacification of life.

Fascism is a resistance to this, even if it is a profound, irrational, demented resistance, it would not have tapped into this massive energy if it hadn't been a resistance to something much worse.

Fascism's cruelty, its terror is on the level of this other terror that is the confusion of the real and the rational, which deepened in the West, and it is a response to that.

I find it difficult to accept such simplistic explanations. If Althusser is too oblique, too opaque with his dense, technical style, Baudrillard is too colloquial, too disorganized.

If Althusser condenses an unbelievable number of concepts in a short essay, Baudrillard lets his essay run watery, diluted.

I was elated at first at his easy style. Soon, I grew tired of it — he takes too much time to say a little thing. Perhaps, as a live lecture, it might have not been so dry to read, but as a text, it needed to be a little tighter, a little denser, condensed.

Alan Howe on Baudrillard 1. View all 7 comments. Jun 24, Alex Lee rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , philosophy , critical-theory , This is not an easy book to read, in part because Baudrillard starts off with his ideas in full development and then talks around them, to explain them.

He will start off with an example, develop the idea within the example, and then end by wrapping the example around itself, rather than ending on continual applications of the idea.

In any case, he doesn't do the historicity thing by telling you the past, where the idea may have come from, and then develop the series of thoughts that outline the This is not an easy book to read, in part because Baudrillard starts off with his ideas in full development and then talks around them, to explain them.

In any case, he doesn't do the historicity thing by telling you the past, where the idea may have come from, and then develop the series of thoughts that outline the form of the idea.

Instead, Baudrillard plops you in the middle and makes you flounder. And unlike other thinkers, he doesn't quote too many philosophers; in fact, nearly none at all.

Get it or not. Baudrillard's basic idea is that we don't live in reality—that is, in the common sense use of the word, there is no thing-in-itself.

Following Quentin Meillasoux, Baudrillard is an absolute correlationist: the relationship we have with language is what also determinates any outside of language.

Thus, for Baudrillard, we live in a world of simulacra. That's easy so far. But there's a catch. For Baudrillard, reality has already been exceeded because the processes that we buy into.

These processes are unthinking, mechanical means that produce the simulacra which we then take for the actual thing. The easy examples of postmodern malls in America come to mind, or Disneyland.

Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, whereas all of Los Angeles and the America that surrounds it are no longer real, but belong to the hyperreal order and to the order of simulation 12 — But such simulations only act to hide the fact that we can't get back to reality because we've lost it.

So this explains why Baudrillard drops us into the mix. He can't explain why this happened. Once we've gotten sucked into hyperreality we're here.

It's a traumatic event. The sheer force of hyperreality obscures any possibility of a central signifier.

Instead, he talks of what remains when the model has exhausted itself. You might say hey, wait, isn't everything real? And yes, that's how language is, but the model for what is real and what is hyperreal have become the same.

For instance, in talking of diplomas, their ubiquity and the ease at which they can be acquired— for whoever goes through the process gets one—signifies nothing but their meaninglessness.

What makes diplomas meaningless is that it's not about knowledge; it's about process. Diplomas connect in a system of simulacra that only point to other simulacra.

Similar to Derrida, with Baudrillard, we end with a passed reference that is always missed. The process of going through replaces the reality of a family trip, so that really, you're just "doing" the "family trip.

This is like how fake internet money in a game treated like real money in an economy becomes real money. The caveat is that real money then is just as fake as fake money because it's just another simulation due to a formal process.

Baudrillard notes that, like the Borges story, the territory itself decays when the map of the territory replaces the territory by being the territory itself.

The simulacra of simulation, the pattern itself, the hyperreality has taken over reality by replacing reality. In hyperreality, the map meant to represent reality becomes a simulacra of reality itself so that we don't get real, we get the map qua real qua map.

The fact that he is able to note the lack of a lack, as Zizek would say: the anti-philosophy at the heart of philosophy, so to speak, places Baudrillard with all the other philosophical greats of our time.

He notices the void that persists throughout simulation: that which organizes simulacra and leaves only sense making in its wake. Meaning, truth, the real cannot appear except locally, in a restricted horizon, they are partial objects, partial effects of the mirror and of equivalence.

All doubling, all generalization, all passage to the limit, all holographic extension the fancy of exhaustively taking account of this universe makes them surface in their mockery — Thus, the curve of meaning making is in fact what is created through the distortion of the absent remainder, leaving us only sensible sense, the trace that makes sense.

In other words, when speaking of truth, or ideology, Baudrillard is able to show us how adding the unnameable nothing the social totality, the remainder back into the mix gets us the totality that we cannot exceed.

The simulation always over-codes totality by naming its void, leaving us always within the wake of its own logic. But the social as a totality, as a bare named signifier, persists because the social always remains as a residue to mark the situation we are in.

With the naming of any void, the absent remainder, we can never get away from conditions like being in society, whatever ideology or other kinds of hyperreality.

Hyperreality is the kind of situation presupposes the very topography that we are trying to define, to get away from!

If anything, what is confusing about Baudrillard is that he does not allow us any access, imaginary or real, to what we are talking about.

What he calls simulation is also the very naming of a given set of the conditions that allow us to talk about anything at all, simply because such terms act as null reference points to its own generic logic.

I am split on liking the reviews through Goodreads and Amazon where people obviously didn't get it, and thus didn't like it, and disliking such reviews by hurt readers who rebelled at feeling stupid, or having their time wasted and it's hard to tell the difference when you're not sure what you are reading about.

To be honest, I've read this book three times over the past 10 years, and each time I've come away with a fuller picture.

This is one of the hardest books I've ever read, and that includes any of Zizek or Deleuze's works. Overall, I appreciate this difficulty because in making you work for it, the concept will stick with you.

You'll make the concept your own, and you'll remember it better. It can inspire you, help you along. If the entire concept everything was handed to you, you'd lose the influence.

In this sense, by stretching in a new way, you end up in the 'pataphysical, where the meaning stands on its own. Is this a site of resistance to the ubiquitous hyperreality?

With 'pataphysics, you get something that can stand in for itself on its own by itself, in this case, each particular re-reading. Although, it is arguable that while there is the process of reading, if you read the good stuff, each time it will be different.

This difference however, is really a pre-fabricated genre soaked simularca because it is different. The real, the real object is supposed to be equal to itself, it is supposed to resemble itself like a face in a mirror—and this virtual similitude is in effect the only definition of real—and any attempt, including the holographic one, that rests on it, will inevitably miss its object, because it does not take its shadow into account precisely the reason why it does not resemble itself —this hidden face where the object crumbles, its secret.

The holographic attempt literally jumps over its shadow, and plunges into transparency, to lose itself there , original italics.

Whatever process of reading you have, you inevitably create a conception of it, and in that conception, blur the totality of everything else around it, to make room for this conception.

So in a twist of Baudrillardian logic, perhaps we read Simulacra and Simulation in order to claim everything is a simulation.

This book has simply managed to put me off all things post-structuralist and French at the same time. And has introduced a measure of disgust which I now feel towards both these subjects.

There are things you come across when you read a lot, things which sound profound and deep and wide-ranging before you realise that they are neither profound nor possess the all-encompassing grandeur which they make you think they do.

Simulacra and Simulation is such a work. The self-serving circular logic of sel This book has simply managed to put me off all things post-structuralist and French at the same time.

The self-serving circular logic of self-referential meaning sounds like it is an amazing and complex concept, its not. It is a denial of reality, and not just a denial but an outright perversion of the concept of things happening.

It is a snobby, first-world centric discourse which denies importance to the lives and shared histories of the under-developed world.

Baudrillard may put on airs of being a visionary, but his vision falls woefully short. I will not lie, the book is very well-written and is very beautiful despite being a very difficult read.

But this isn't a novel, to be judged on presentation, but a philosophical tract, to be judged on the basis of its ideas. Not only do I disagree with these ideas, I find myself having a rather strong reaction to them, and I think that anyone willing to look beyond the reputation of the thinker will understand just what it is that this man speaks of.

View 1 comment. Jul 09, Iain rated it did not like it. This book is only so highly rated because it is utterly incomprehensible.

Baudrillard revelled in using hundreds of words to write what were really quite simple and flimsy arguments. Responsible for inspiring a lot of impenetrable 'art-speak' which is unfortunately common at a lot of art school degree shows nowadays.

Jan 11, Adam rated it liked it Shelves: present , continental-philosophy. Completely agree with everything said in Shiv's review, as quoted: "Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

If y Completely agree with everything said in Shiv's review, as quoted: "Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

Also would add that, perhaps mildly contradicting my agreement with the complaint about Baudrillard's language, Baudrillard and other relatively speaking great continentalists would probably have been better off as literary authors, communicating these worthy ideas through art instead of jargon-laden and obtuse 'philosophy.

As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and failed phantasms.

Nov 29, Tyrran marked it as to-read. This book cannot be read like a Haruki Murakami novel, one to enthrall you during relaxation.

This book is more like study material, each sentence of Baudrillard's can be heavily read into and some sentences require extended knowledge on the subject to my dismay it forced me to endure a Jorge Luis Borges short-story.

What piqued my interest to this book initially was from another book I read "Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix" by David Gerrold I should howeve This book cannot be read like a Haruki Murakami novel, one to enthrall you during relaxation.

What piqued my interest to this book initially was from another book I read "Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix" by David Gerrold I should however note that this book on The Matrix is made up from a collection of essays from novelists, academics and just important people in their fields who is actually a member of Goodreads, there was a lot of Baudrillard work mentioned in that book and so I decided to expand my knowledge and source out "Simulacra And Simulation".

Feb 06, Stephanie rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Philosophers and anyone with an open-mind.

This is the kind of book that you find yourself bringing up in conversations all the time. It is applicable on so many levels; once you grasp the concept, it really grasps you back.

It is relevant to me as an anthropologist, archaeologist and psychologist, but I would classify it more as a philosophy book.

Bottom line: This book will do you good. In spite of the difficulties I had with this challanging work, I believe I get it. We are living in end times and we're screwed by our notions of and distance from reality.

From the premises "Reproduction is always diabolicalin its very essence Dec 18, Bickety Bam rated it it was ok. About two-thirds of the way through, I started to wonder if the whole book wasn't intended to be some sort of sick academic joke.

While there were a few interesting points in it, I can't imagine a worse presentation of them. Jun 28, David rated it liked it.

The Man Who Hates Everything helps define the hopelessness and helplessness of the postmodern world. He succeeds brilliantly; or, considering his goal, horribly.

He starts off strong, putting forth some stunning ideas while taking on God, Disneyland, Watergate, journalism, cinema, and advertising. He starts to stumble when he moves on to technology, and totally loses his thread when he tries to bring in sexuality, animals, and his ridiculous gender politics.

He finishes by writing about the subje The Man Who Hates Everything helps define the hopelessness and helplessness of the postmodern world.

He finishes by writing about the subject I suspect he was most interested in all along: himself. The translation leaves much to be desired, though I can't criticize too strongly: anyone tasked with translating this dense doom-and-gloom psychobabble deserves our empathy.

Warning: plodding finish, rampant sexism, and a laser-like focus on Western white male subjectivity. Downloading the example code for this book.

Download Example Code. Skip to main content. Start your free trial. Book Description Harness actionable insights from your data with computational statistics and simulations using R About This Book Learn five different simulation techniques Monte Carlo, Discrete Event Simulation, System Dynamics, Agent-Based Modeling, and Resampling in-depth using real-world case studies A unique book that teaches you the essential and fundamental concepts in statistical modeling and simulation Who This Book Is For This book is for users who are familiar with computational methods.

What You Will Learn The book aims to explore advanced R features to simulate data to extract insights from your data. Get to know the advanced features of R including high-performance computing and advanced data manipulation See random number simulation used to simulate distributions, data sets, and populations Simulate close-to-reality populations as the basis for agent-based micro-, model- and design-based simulations Applications to design statistical solutions with R for solving scientific and real world problems Comprehensive coverage of several R statistical packages like boot, simPop, VIM, data.

In Detail Data Science with R aims to teach you how to begin performing data science tasks by taking advantage of Rs powerful ecosystem of packages.

Style and approach This book takes a practical, hands-on approach to explain the statistical computing methods, gives advice on the usage of these methods, and provides computational tools to help you solve common problems in statistical simulation and computer-intense methods.

Show and hide more. Publisher Resources Download Example Code. Table of Contents Product Information.

Preface What this book covers What you need for this book Who this book is for Conventions Reader feedback Customer support Downloading the example code Downloading the color images of this book Errata Piracy Questions 1.

Introduction What is simulation and where is it applied? Why use simulation? Simulation and big data Choosing the right simulation technique Summary References 2.

The Discrepancy between Pencil-Driven Theory and Data-Driven Computational Solutions Machine numbers and rounding problems Example — the bit representation of numbers Convergence in the deterministic case Example — convergence Condition of problems Summary References 4.

Simulation of Random Numbers Real random numbers Simulating pseudo random numbers Congruential generators Linear and multiplicative congruential generators Lagged Fibonacci generators More generators Simulation of non-uniform distributed random variables The inversion method The alias method Estimation of counts in tables with log-linear models Rejection sampling Simulating values from a normal distribution Simulating random numbers from a Beta distribution Truncated distributions Metropolis - Hastings algorithm A few words on Markov chains The Metropolis sampler The Gibbs sampler The two-phase Gibbs sampler The multiphase Gibbs sampler Application in linear regression The diagnosis of MCMC samples Tests for random numbers The evaluation of random numbers — an example of a test Summary References 5.

Once we've gotten sucked into hyperreality we're here. It's a traumatic event. The sheer force of hyperreality obscures any possibility of a central signifier.

Instead, he talks of what remains when the model has exhausted itself. You might say hey, wait, isn't everything real?

And yes, that's how language is, but the model for what is real and what is hyperreal have become the same. For instance, in talking of diplomas, their ubiquity and the ease at which they can be acquired— for whoever goes through the process gets one—signifies nothing but their meaninglessness.

What makes diplomas meaningless is that it's not about knowledge; it's about process. Diplomas connect in a system of simulacra that only point to other simulacra.

Similar to Derrida, with Baudrillard, we end with a passed reference that is always missed. The process of going through replaces the reality of a family trip, so that really, you're just "doing" the "family trip.

This is like how fake internet money in a game treated like real money in an economy becomes real money. The caveat is that real money then is just as fake as fake money because it's just another simulation due to a formal process.

Baudrillard notes that, like the Borges story, the territory itself decays when the map of the territory replaces the territory by being the territory itself.

The simulacra of simulation, the pattern itself, the hyperreality has taken over reality by replacing reality. In hyperreality, the map meant to represent reality becomes a simulacra of reality itself so that we don't get real, we get the map qua real qua map.

The fact that he is able to note the lack of a lack, as Zizek would say: the anti-philosophy at the heart of philosophy, so to speak, places Baudrillard with all the other philosophical greats of our time.

He notices the void that persists throughout simulation: that which organizes simulacra and leaves only sense making in its wake.

Meaning, truth, the real cannot appear except locally, in a restricted horizon, they are partial objects, partial effects of the mirror and of equivalence.

All doubling, all generalization, all passage to the limit, all holographic extension the fancy of exhaustively taking account of this universe makes them surface in their mockery — Thus, the curve of meaning making is in fact what is created through the distortion of the absent remainder, leaving us only sensible sense, the trace that makes sense.

In other words, when speaking of truth, or ideology, Baudrillard is able to show us how adding the unnameable nothing the social totality, the remainder back into the mix gets us the totality that we cannot exceed.

The simulation always over-codes totality by naming its void, leaving us always within the wake of its own logic.

But the social as a totality, as a bare named signifier, persists because the social always remains as a residue to mark the situation we are in.

With the naming of any void, the absent remainder, we can never get away from conditions like being in society, whatever ideology or other kinds of hyperreality.

Hyperreality is the kind of situation presupposes the very topography that we are trying to define, to get away from! If anything, what is confusing about Baudrillard is that he does not allow us any access, imaginary or real, to what we are talking about.

What he calls simulation is also the very naming of a given set of the conditions that allow us to talk about anything at all, simply because such terms act as null reference points to its own generic logic.

I am split on liking the reviews through Goodreads and Amazon where people obviously didn't get it, and thus didn't like it, and disliking such reviews by hurt readers who rebelled at feeling stupid, or having their time wasted and it's hard to tell the difference when you're not sure what you are reading about.

To be honest, I've read this book three times over the past 10 years, and each time I've come away with a fuller picture. This is one of the hardest books I've ever read, and that includes any of Zizek or Deleuze's works.

Overall, I appreciate this difficulty because in making you work for it, the concept will stick with you. You'll make the concept your own, and you'll remember it better.

It can inspire you, help you along. If the entire concept everything was handed to you, you'd lose the influence.

In this sense, by stretching in a new way, you end up in the 'pataphysical, where the meaning stands on its own.

Is this a site of resistance to the ubiquitous hyperreality? With 'pataphysics, you get something that can stand in for itself on its own by itself, in this case, each particular re-reading.

Although, it is arguable that while there is the process of reading, if you read the good stuff, each time it will be different. This difference however, is really a pre-fabricated genre soaked simularca because it is different.

The real, the real object is supposed to be equal to itself, it is supposed to resemble itself like a face in a mirror—and this virtual similitude is in effect the only definition of real—and any attempt, including the holographic one, that rests on it, will inevitably miss its object, because it does not take its shadow into account precisely the reason why it does not resemble itself —this hidden face where the object crumbles, its secret.

The holographic attempt literally jumps over its shadow, and plunges into transparency, to lose itself there , original italics.

Whatever process of reading you have, you inevitably create a conception of it, and in that conception, blur the totality of everything else around it, to make room for this conception.

So in a twist of Baudrillardian logic, perhaps we read Simulacra and Simulation in order to claim everything is a simulation. This book has simply managed to put me off all things post-structuralist and French at the same time.

And has introduced a measure of disgust which I now feel towards both these subjects. There are things you come across when you read a lot, things which sound profound and deep and wide-ranging before you realise that they are neither profound nor possess the all-encompassing grandeur which they make you think they do.

Simulacra and Simulation is such a work. The self-serving circular logic of sel This book has simply managed to put me off all things post-structuralist and French at the same time.

The self-serving circular logic of self-referential meaning sounds like it is an amazing and complex concept, its not. It is a denial of reality, and not just a denial but an outright perversion of the concept of things happening.

It is a snobby, first-world centric discourse which denies importance to the lives and shared histories of the under-developed world.

Baudrillard may put on airs of being a visionary, but his vision falls woefully short. I will not lie, the book is very well-written and is very beautiful despite being a very difficult read.

But this isn't a novel, to be judged on presentation, but a philosophical tract, to be judged on the basis of its ideas. Not only do I disagree with these ideas, I find myself having a rather strong reaction to them, and I think that anyone willing to look beyond the reputation of the thinker will understand just what it is that this man speaks of.

View 1 comment. Jul 09, Iain rated it did not like it. This book is only so highly rated because it is utterly incomprehensible. Baudrillard revelled in using hundreds of words to write what were really quite simple and flimsy arguments.

Responsible for inspiring a lot of impenetrable 'art-speak' which is unfortunately common at a lot of art school degree shows nowadays.

Jan 11, Adam rated it liked it Shelves: present , continental-philosophy. Completely agree with everything said in Shiv's review, as quoted: "Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

If y Completely agree with everything said in Shiv's review, as quoted: "Some authors have a gift of being able to explain complex matters in simple terms.

Also would add that, perhaps mildly contradicting my agreement with the complaint about Baudrillard's language, Baudrillard and other relatively speaking great continentalists would probably have been better off as literary authors, communicating these worthy ideas through art instead of jargon-laden and obtuse 'philosophy.

As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and failed phantasms.

Nov 29, Tyrran marked it as to-read. This book cannot be read like a Haruki Murakami novel, one to enthrall you during relaxation. This book is more like study material, each sentence of Baudrillard's can be heavily read into and some sentences require extended knowledge on the subject to my dismay it forced me to endure a Jorge Luis Borges short-story.

What piqued my interest to this book initially was from another book I read "Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix" by David Gerrold I should howeve This book cannot be read like a Haruki Murakami novel, one to enthrall you during relaxation.

What piqued my interest to this book initially was from another book I read "Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix" by David Gerrold I should however note that this book on The Matrix is made up from a collection of essays from novelists, academics and just important people in their fields who is actually a member of Goodreads, there was a lot of Baudrillard work mentioned in that book and so I decided to expand my knowledge and source out "Simulacra And Simulation".

Feb 06, Stephanie rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Philosophers and anyone with an open-mind.

This is the kind of book that you find yourself bringing up in conversations all the time. It is applicable on so many levels; once you grasp the concept, it really grasps you back.

It is relevant to me as an anthropologist, archaeologist and psychologist, but I would classify it more as a philosophy book.

Bottom line: This book will do you good. In spite of the difficulties I had with this challanging work, I believe I get it. We are living in end times and we're screwed by our notions of and distance from reality.

From the premises "Reproduction is always diabolicalin its very essence Dec 18, Bickety Bam rated it it was ok.

About two-thirds of the way through, I started to wonder if the whole book wasn't intended to be some sort of sick academic joke.

While there were a few interesting points in it, I can't imagine a worse presentation of them. Jun 28, David rated it liked it. The Man Who Hates Everything helps define the hopelessness and helplessness of the postmodern world.

He succeeds brilliantly; or, considering his goal, horribly. He starts off strong, putting forth some stunning ideas while taking on God, Disneyland, Watergate, journalism, cinema, and advertising.

He starts to stumble when he moves on to technology, and totally loses his thread when he tries to bring in sexuality, animals, and his ridiculous gender politics.

He finishes by writing about the subje The Man Who Hates Everything helps define the hopelessness and helplessness of the postmodern world.

He finishes by writing about the subject I suspect he was most interested in all along: himself. The translation leaves much to be desired, though I can't criticize too strongly: anyone tasked with translating this dense doom-and-gloom psychobabble deserves our empathy.

Warning: plodding finish, rampant sexism, and a laser-like focus on Western white male subjectivity. If you don't need your books to be pleasant, highly recommended.

Oct 07, Maxim rated it really liked it. Please, welcome our new cybernetics prophet to whom everyone will bow in 30 years.

Jean Baudrillard, postmodern thinker, despairs; he claims, in "Forget Foucault," that there is an "impossibility of any politics" in our current situation.

An important part of this context are media simulations, of reality so obscured by the play of images completely unrelated to any "reality" which might be out there that we are hopelessly incapable of arriving at any judgments on which to base political decisions and actions.

Images on television and in the movies and in other media are "floa Jean Baudrillard, postmodern thinker, despairs; he claims, in "Forget Foucault," that there is an "impossibility of any politics" in our current situation.

Images on television and in the movies and in other media are "floating signifiers," having no real connection to concrete referents.

The key concept associated with Baudrillard is simulations and the simulacrum. He begins by quoting Ecclesiastes: "The simulacrum is never that which conceals the truth--it is the truth that conceals that there is none.

The simulacrum is true" by the way, this quotation may be a simulacrum; I could not find it in Ecclesiastes! Simulations began historically as replicas of the real, as reflections of "reality.

Simulations do not have reference points or substance or any tie to "reality. We face a procession of images and simulations, and lose sight of the simple fact that they are "floating signifiers.

Put in post-structural or postmodern terms, the models created are floating signifiers simulations in Baudrillard's terms which structure people's discourse with one another and shape their behavior.

Images become crucial in politics. After presidential debates or major policy speeches or elections, the "spin patrol" gets going.

These are the spokespersons of the parties or candidates who try to convince the audience that their simulations of the event are better than their opponents' simulations.

In the process, no one particularly cares what actually happened or what was said. It is the simulations pushed by the various actors that become the news.

Baudrillard's writing is challenging; many will write him off as an unreadable crank. Nonetheless, the underlying concept of the simulacrum is fascinating and generates much reflection.

This is a postmodern work that may actually speak to some real world issues. Jun 17, Brandon Woodward rated it really liked it.

In The Matrix, people live in a world that seems real, but is actually a simulation manufactured by robots so they can feed on our energy.

Baudrillard says that this is the case for all of us right now. We live in a simulacrum, a world of images without reference, a world without meaning or purpose worse, a world that wants desperately to convince you of its meaning and purpose.

All striking does is legitimize the idea of work. All prisons do is make everybody else think they are free. In this way the system we created has turned against us like the robots in The Matrix.

Everything has this nature of doubling back and perpetuating itself. Everything is strange and absurd as is the case with most postmodern philosophy.

I could go on, but if any of this is interesting to you, you might as well just read the book. His writing style is unforgiving and surely lost in translation , he casually references many movies, books, and events without introduction or explanation, and has many other idiosyncrasies in style.

The first and last few sections are really strong, the middle ones a bit mediocre. Overall, the ideas presented are really interesting and will change the way you view culture and reality itself.

Nov 09, Ellen rated it really liked it Shelves: theory , major-theorists , visual-culture. Not so much a review as an illustration of why I like his thinking so much.

A couple of excerpts from his book: If we were able to view the Borges fable in which the cartographers of the Empire draw up a map so detailed that it ends up covering the territory exactly the decline of the Empire witnesses the fraying of this map, little by little, and its fall into ruins, though some shreds are still discernible in the deserts—the metaphysical beauty of this ruined abstraction testifying to a pride Not so much a review as an illustration of why I like his thinking so much.

A couple of excerpts from his book: If we were able to view the Borges fable in which the cartographers of the Empire draw up a map so detailed that it ends up covering the territory exactly the decline of the Empire witnesses the fraying of this map, little by little, and its fall into ruins, though some shreds are still discernible in the deserts—the metaphysical beauty of this ruined abstraction testifying to a pride equal to the Empire and rotting like a carcass, returning to the substance of the soil, a bit as the double ends by beings confused with the real through aging —as the most beautiful allegory of simulation, this fable has now come full circle for us, and possesses nothing but the discrete charm of second-order simulacra.

Today abstraction is no longer that of the map, the double, the mirror, or the concept. Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being, or a substance.

It is the generation by models of a real without origin or reality: a hyperreal. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality ideology but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.

I read part of the first half back in college. Going through it again I find myself having the same reservations, Baudrillard's style is overly dependent on these really repetitive, almost cheekily nihilistic assertions.

And while his in-your-face style is provocative, ultimately, it just amounts to an aweful lot of empty rhetoric about how totally empty everything is.

A lot of it just seems like stuff he read and regurgitated from Deleuze and Foucault and then mixed up with his own sense of che I read part of the first half back in college.

A lot of it just seems like stuff he read and regurgitated from Deleuze and Foucault and then mixed up with his own sense of cheap posturing.

Also, the second half feels incredibly dated with its cheap analysis of late cold-war tensions and half-assed attempts to synthesize a 4th grade level understanding of genetics and emerging cybernetic jargon into his broader system of thought, or anti-system of thought, or whatever it is he thinks he's doing here.

If your going to read it, take it with an especially big grain of salt. Feb 06, Craig Jaquish rated it it was amazing. A few years ago I came across a study where female chimps were found to prefer caricatured images of the alpha males over untouched images.

The chicks pecked just as frantically at a red dot on a black stick. The hyperreal seems to be something like this where the essential component parts of a thing are inflated to the degree that the mere connective tissue drops from exis A few years ago I came across a study where female chimps were found to prefer caricatured images of the alpha males over untouched images.

The hyperreal seems to be something like this where the essential component parts of a thing are inflated to the degree that the mere connective tissue drops from existence.

When only the meaningful elements are left meaning is impossible. In a spiral of nostalgia almost, we continue to caricature the caricatures to the point where the original is unknowable.

I finished this a couple of days ago and I still think of things that I've read in the book. It is, the least to say, an original book.

I appreciate how Baudrillard conceives a whole new level of reality. Hypereality is that which is more real than the real. It is getting rid of representations mirrors and keeping the empty simulations to rule and guide us.

However, to what extent is this real? Nov 26, Stan Van rated it really liked it. Simulacra and Simulation is the Kama Sutra of mental masturbation.

May 05, Ian rated it it was amazing Shelves: theory , philosophy , media-theory , critical-design. Our entire linear and accumulative culture collapses if we cannot stockpile the past in plain view" Baudrillard, pgs.

As much as electrical and atomic power stations, as much as cinema studios, this city, which is no longer anything but an immense scenario and a perpetual pan shot, needs this old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms" Baudrillard, pg.

Simulation is characterized by a precession of the model , of all the models based on the merest fact—the models come first, their circulation, orbital like that of the bomb, constitutes the genuine magnetic field of the event.

The facts no longer have a specific trajectory, they are born at the intersection of models, a single fact can be engendered by all the models at once.

This anticipation, this precession, this short circuit, this confusion of the fact with its model no more divergence of meaning, no more dialectical polarity, no more negative electricity, implosions of antagonistic poles , is what allows each time for all possible interpretations, even the most contradictory—all true, in the sense that their truth is to be exchanged, in the image of the models from which they derive, in a generalized cycle" Baudrillard, pgs.

Programmed microcosm, where nothing can be left to chance. Trajectory, energy, calculation, physiology, psychology, environment—nothing can be left to contingencies, this is the total universe of the norm—the Law no longer exists, it is the operational immanence of every detail that is law.

A universe purged of all threat of meaning, in a state of asepsis and weightlessness—it is this very perfection that is fascinating. The exaltation of the crowds was not a response to the event of landing on the moon or of sending a man into space this would be, rather, the fulfillment of an earlier dream , rather, we are dumbfounded by the perfection of the programming and the technical manipulation, by the immanent wonder of the programmed unfolding of events.

Fascination with the maximal norm and the mastery of probability. Vertigo of the model , which unites with the model of death, but without fear or drive.

Because if the law, with it aura of transgression, if order, with its aura of violence, stills taps a perverse imaginary, the norm fixes, fascinates, stupefies, and makes every imaginary involute.

One no longer fantasizes about the minutiae of a program. Just watching it produces vertigo. The vertigo of a world without flaws" Baudrillard, pg.

It is a bit like the real danger nuclear power stations pose: not lack of security, pollution, explosion, but a system of maximum security that radiates around them, the protective zone of control and deterrence that extends, slowly but surely, over the territory—a technical, ecological, economic, geopolitical glacis.

What does the nuclear matter? The station is a matrix in which the absolute model of security is elaborated, which will encompass the whole social field, and which is fundamentally a model of deterrence it is the same one that controls us globally, under the sign of peaceful coexistence and of the simulation of atomic danger " Baudrillard, pg.

But this is in some sense the end of the aesthetic and the triumph of the medium, exactly as in stereophonia , which, at its most sophisticated limits, neatly puts an end to the charm and the intelligence of music" Baudrillard, pg.

It thus never has reproductive truth value, but always already simulation value. Not an exact, but a transgressive truth, that is to say already on the other side of the truth" Baudrillard, pg.

The car is not the appendix of a domestic, immobile universe, there are only incessant figures of circulation, and the Accident is everywhere, the elementary, irreversible figure, the banality of the anomaly of death.

And the automobile, the magnetic sphere of the automobile, which ends by investing the entire universe with its tunnels, highways, toboggans, exchangers, its mobile dwellings as universal prototype, is nothing but the immense metaphor of life" Baudrillard, pg.

Jul 26, Erik Moore rated it it was amazing. He takes each of these and spins them out of control, bemoaning their loss as a loss of meaning.

In his analysis of everything Baudrillard bemoans the destruction of everything we assume to exist as it is replaced by a simulation that undercuts the authenticity of the real.

He usually follows the dialectic with a repudiation of his own findings, so that there is nothing left of his own position to critique, just a dark feeling of loss.

The most vivid example he uses is that of the Tasaday, the isolated tribe in the Philippines that was supposedly the last humans to be discovered living in a tribal situation that did not know about the rest of the world.

As anthropologist and game show hosts interacted with them, they ceased to be authentic, that is, ceased to be the Tasaday. It is still a question whether they were real, or how much of it was a hoax.

But this insight of Baudrillard is interesting. In the same way, he analyzes the Watergate scandal as a planned media event, showing how the release of pressure through complicity of reporters actually allowed a deeper and more violent round of political espionage to ensue once the American people had achieved intrigue burnout.

As Epcot Morocco gains popularity, as things like it grow around the world, the Authentic Morocco reflects it, imitates it, must be judged against it, until there is no authentic Morocco that it was derived from.

There is only a place on the map where it was and people that live there that have inherited the mixed messages and lived with the image management problem.

Sure, science is looking for empirical facts the dichotomy of real versus imaginary , but he only puts up a straw man when he says that science has lost its foundation of absolute truth in the empirical.

Sound science at its best has never claimed to have absolute facts, but instead claims to have identified patters, to have tested theories, and to have demonstrated levels of surety.

While corporate dollars, career interests, and the malleable models of sociology have all skewed many a result as Thomas Kuhn well points out, Baudrillard cannot use his centrifugal force of nihilism to blow apart either the accumulating meaning of scientific findings, nor the optimism of engineering that allows us to address broader and broader scopes of understanding with broader and broader tools of empowerment.

Fortunately science was not based on Hegelian dialectics, that for all practical purposes were formulated as ways of making essences, forms, and other social conjecturals seem unassailable in a debate of limited choices.

They were managing their message and image in as authentic a way as anybody can day to day. Then I traveled to New Zealand as the chapters rolled on, living with a Maori healer who was exchanging ideas about healing with those of Hindu, Native American, and many other cultures in such an earnest way based on his own cultural background, literally making authentic culture with each step.

The music would have been as at home in Europe, but the subtle lilt of Japanese popular music refrains would have been lost to those ears.

Had the Tasaday been dancing the day before the anthropologists arrived, truly isolated, it would have had no greater authenticity that the hearts of these creative artists.

Experiencing all this as I read and understanding that authentic culture comes from being creative instead of remaining static. I understood that the real simulacrum was Baudrillard himself, posing as a Cassandra, a Jeremiah, and needing to write so that we would feel his nihilistic world falling apart in order to gain our attention, and his own notoriety.

While Baudrillard does have many deep insights into the transformation of modern society, his dark world is in his own admissions a choice and indeed a choice to live in his own dark simulation.

I choose the brighter world I see in the scattered tribes of the world coming together and in the transforming technologies I see revolutionizing our experience and our potential.

Our scientific understanding and our technologies are giving us a world to inherit instead of just a village, and it is all of our legacy to use as authentically as we can.

Indeed, that technology is also giving us the capability to come together as a global species to solve the great challenges of our situation, like asteroids, viruses, our environmental stability, and more.

We have this opportunity and can use it to rise up above nihilism to new possibilities of survival, expansion, and transformation.

Despite it's shortness, this is a meaty book. It's one of those books that make you pause to think after almost every sentence.

Part of this is due to the depth of the content and part of it is because the author or perhaps the translator? The basic idea is that signs, symbols, and simulations no longer refer back to a reality, but instead have meaning and effect on their own.

This is an i Despite it's shortness, this is a meaty book. This is an intriguing idea that is worth thinking about.

May 20, Remus Balint rated it it was amazing. I will never existentially recover from this. May 30, LPG rated it liked it. Old mate made some fair points, but on the whole his outlook was a bit much for me.

There was a realisation I had while in high school, up late and writing an ill-fated essay. The stars will always align if you tilt your head just right.

The proof will come to you if you know just where to reach for it. This book was a lot like that. Very clever. Very depressing. And very focused on one persons version of the truth.

Not a bad readi Hmmm. Not a bad reading experience though. It certainly got me thinking. Feb 04, Kevin rated it it was amazing. In our present world, which has sprung from reality television, our center of gravity has flipped from the planet reality to the orbital a map of reality.

Within our collective, it is the medium, rather than the reality, which renders most true. In Simulacra and Simulation, through a series of short essays, Baudrillard unveils this model of the hyperreal, a world in which the the precession of simulacrum a copy without an original , leads to postmodern landscape where the medium is confused as the real.

According to Baudrillard, in our coming world, the sovereign difference between the real and its symbol have dissolved, and the charm of abstraction has dissolved along with it.

After getting to know the background of popular methods in the area of computational statistics, you will see some applications in R to better understand the methods as well as gaining experience of working with real-world data and real-world problems.

This book helps uncover the large-scale patterns in complex systems where interdependencies and variation are critical.

An effective simulation is driven by data generating processes that accurately reflect real physical populations. You will learn how to plan and structure a simulation project to aid in the decision-making process as well as the presentation of results.

By the end of this book, you reader will get in touch with the software environment R. After getting background on popular methods in the area, you will see applications in R to better understand the methods as well as to gain experience when working on real-world data and real-world problems.

This book takes a practical, hands-on approach to explain the statistical computing methods, gives advice on the usage of these methods, and provides computational tools to help you solve common problems in statistical simulation and computer-intense methods.

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Book Description Harness actionable insights from your data with computational statistics and simulations using R About This Book Learn five different simulation techniques Monte Carlo, Discrete Event Simulation, System Dynamics, Agent-Based Modeling, and Resampling in-depth using real-world case studies A unique book that teaches you the essential and fundamental concepts in statistical modeling and simulation Who This Book Is For This book is for users who are familiar with computational methods.

What You Will Learn The book aims to explore advanced R features to simulate data to extract insights from your data.

Get to know the advanced features of R including high-performance computing and advanced data manipulation See random number simulation used to simulate distributions, data sets, and populations Simulate close-to-reality populations as the basis for agent-based micro-, model- and design-based simulations Applications to design statistical solutions with R for solving scientific and real world problems Comprehensive coverage of several R statistical packages like boot, simPop, VIM, data.

In Detail Data Science with R aims to teach you how to begin performing data science tasks by taking advantage of Rs powerful ecosystem of packages.

Style and approach This book takes a practical, hands-on approach to explain the statistical computing methods, gives advice on the usage of these methods, and provides computational tools to help you solve common problems in statistical simulation and computer-intense methods.

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